Professor

Richard John Grant

Arbeids- og kompetanseområde

My research focus tends to steer towards ‘the useful and the practical’. Initial work on light weight structural frameworks considering pin-loaded tubular connections, their validation and fatigue performance, was the subject of my early research and has continued as an underlying theme thereafter; with little other literature published in the field by others. Framework analysis has included ‘play structures’ and three-dimensional analysis of pin-loaded lug joints. Co-supervision of a doctoral researcher in the field of wing design to reduce wake vortices has led to further research in coupled FEM-CFD multiphysics simulations. Cooperation with Kempten University of Applied Sciences Germany at doctoral level has seen my involvement in patented friction surfacing and welding technologies which offer important practical applications significantly in the vehicle and aerospace industries. A further doctoral level collaboration with Aalen University of Applied Sciences has developed the technique of cryogenic forming of vehicle structures relevant to the automotive and aerospace industries. This work has the backing of a significant industrial partner Voestalpine. Other research includes the use of boundary element analysis to investigate the effect of fatigue on cold expanded aluminium alloy plates and also the design of total ankle replacement prostheses in collaboration with an internationally renowned orthopaedic hospital (RJAH, Oswestry, UK). A theme that is inherent to most of my research is more often than not energy efficiency. Weight is crucial in aircraft structural design whether considering space frames or advanced linear welding techniques; coatings applied to lightweight materials again provide lightweight, but durable structures; the use of lower cost aluminium alloys for vehicle structures is driven by offering their efficiency benefits in mainstream car production; and advanced wing design offers large savings in airline operating costs. These all equate to a reduced energy requirement.